Ghost Party ~ WGD ‘Spooky (2016)’ Three-Week Competition

It’s been a while since I’ve properly sat down and made a game, apart from the Zero Hour Game Jam, which I entered with an entirely broken game about shooting ghosts with a flashlight. Today, after having three weeks to work on a game, I decided to start one the day it was due to be shown.

3dspooky5me

My Zero Hour Game Jam entry, the lesser of my two games about flashing ghosts.

I decided that my Zero Hour Game Jam entry had a few flaws, the main one being that you magically die after about 30 seconds every time without being visibly hit by anything. You hit ghosts by aiming straight at them; unfortunately, this means you have to aim the centre of the screen at them as the game uses a raycast, but there is no crosshair so it’s almost impossible to tell if you’re hitting the mark except that the ghosts turn red.

I did like the idea of hitting ghosts with a flashlight though, so I kept it and made a brand new game today with a different art style: crayons. You might think I’m crazy, but when you’re time-constrained, it always helps to think of quick hacks to make things easy. I could have just as easily used normal coloured pencil to draw everything, but a bad artist (or in this case, a rushed one, although I’m not exactly Picasso to start with) will always make coloured pencil look crap. On the contrary, when someone thinks of wax crayons, you think of a 5-year-old’s drawing tacked onto the fridge. Essentially, wax crayons have a very low skill ceiling and I exploited the heck out of that. It made for a very consistent style and I actually really like it! It’s similar to the style I used for Tappy Dev, but I think it’s possibly better.

screenshot_01

Yellow ghost is far too happy.

The general idea is that ghosts spawn from left and right, and it’s your job to shoot them down with your flashlight by clicking on them. It’s better than 3DSpooky5Me (my 0h game jam game), in that you can see the mouse cursor to indicate where you’re aiming. The ghosts are also much cuter.

Given more time, I’d go back and make sure the proportions of all the objects in the game were consistent. As you can see, the ground’s outline is very thick compared to that of the ghosts, despite being drawn using the same crayons. I’d also change the design of the gravestones and the large tombstones, since my friend said they look like printers. While the thought of a haunted Konica Minolta fills me with glee, I might save that idea for when I’m in a real jam.

I also need to change the mechanics a bit. Similar to the 0h Game Jam, I didn’t make the flashlight affect an area, but stuck with a raycast; having the flashlight hit all ghosts in its range when flashed would open up the possibility of combos and make the mechanic feel more satisfying when you line up 5 ghosts in the same flash. Currently, the score increments by a strange formula I devised based on the speed, sine-waviness and z-distance of the ghosts, but I feel this should be better communicated to the player, as it’s difficult to even notice how many points you got for hitting one. Furthermore, one thing the game lacks entirely is a lose condition, which I was minutes away from getting in the game, but was hindered at the last moment by having to go to the WGD event in which I showed the game.

But the biggest and funniest problem in this build is the unintentional and bewilderingly fast escalation in difficulty. Above was a screenshot from about 30 seconds in, but the following one is from a couple minutes in:

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Points for spotting the cameo appearance.

At the start, the difficulty increases in a linear fashion. Every 5 seconds (although I’d planned to change it to every 20 or 30 seconds and forgot), the time interval between ghost spawns goes down by a fixed amount. It does this 10 times, then it starts going down in a geometric progression. You can see where this is going. Every 5 seconds, the time between spawns is divided by 1.2. Then you end up with a ghost party. It’s a classic example of “oh I’m sure this arbitrarily-picked number will be fine”.

At the early stages of development (read: while zoning out in a lecture this morning, thinking about spooky ghosts), I considered adding some element of a rhythm game into this, but as you’ll find out there is no sound whatsoever. It’s somewhat inspired by the Sneaky Spirits game from Rhythm Paradise (or Rhythm Heaven, for you Americans). I wanted each ghost type to have their own behaviour, but this didn’t come to fruition and they instead all follow sine waves of varying frequency and magnitude.

I wanted the spiky green ones to zig-zag, the puffy white ones to flutter upwards and fall back down a bit constantly, and the blue ones were going to have Pacman-style grid movement. The pale ones were going to have an animated tail that wiggled around and the rare Drifloon (please don’t sue me, Nintendo) would’ve occasionally grabbed a headstone with its tassels and flown off with it. Maybe next build!

All things considered, the most important lesson I’ve learned today is that I should drawn with crayons more often. It’s really easy and looks pretty nice, especially with the Paper Mario-style aesthetic. It’s also not really apt to keep referencing ‘today’, but I’m not a clock so it’s fine. You can download the game here.

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