explosion-01

Chemical Chaos ~ Ludum Dare 37 (One Room)

It’s been over a week since the last Ludum Dare competition ended. This time round, the theme was ‘One Room’, so naturally I made a game about a bunch of chemistry experiments that you have to run around and keep going. This decision was somewhat motivated by the fact that everyone I’ve ever talked to loved chemistry at school and would do anything to do a titration again. After all, knowing your market is half of the battle in game development.

The idea I was going for was a game where the player would be constantly running around, getting one experiment in working order, to find that another couple are starting to fail. It’d ideally be a very hectic game made up of several really easy minigames. For maximum effect, I’d need to create quite a few different experiments; however, I only had enough time to make three to a decent level of completion. I’d also have liked more time to polish some of the game’s aspects, mainly some smaller details like particle effects and other signposting to make it easier to see the status of experiments from afar.

ld37-01

Don’t ask why it turns from blue to red.

The first experiment was a distillation – in real life, you do this experiment to separate some liquid from a solution (you probably used it to purify water in school). The controls are simple – just mash the mouse buttons or controller shoulder buttons to turn down the temperature, as shown by the thermometer. When this experiment fails – when the thermometer is full – there’s a large explosion for no apparent reason.

explosion-01

The most important part of development – particle effects.

There’s a couple things I’d like to improve about this minigame. First of all, the apparatus should probably start to smoke and rattle around a bit as it’s getting close to exploding. And on the subject of explosions, I think the explosion needs to have more impact – sure, all the equipment goes flying and there’s a bit of fire, but I might add more flames that stay alight for a while on the table, and possibly violent screenshake when the explosion actually happens. On the plus side, I was very happy with the ‘reaction cam’ that pops up in the corner when an experiment fails.

ld37-02

John is the best video game character this year.

The second experiment was the good old sodium-in-water one, which as we all know, causes fire. The gameplay for this one involves pressing left click/LB to decrease the amount of sodium and potassium that materialises above John, the water tank, and right click/RB to spawn more. If he gets too little metal, he’ll get bored and will fall to sleep and if he gets too much, he’ll get scared then eventually die. Please try not to kill John.

There are a couple of problems in this screenshot – first of all, the sodium blocks sort of clip through the bottom of John instead of bursting into flames on the surface of the water, something I didn’t catch happening before submission. I’m also confused what may have caused it as I touched none of the relevant code for this between getting the feature working and submission. Secondly, the instructions for this experiment are incorrect, as I seem to have put up the instructions for experiment 1 instead; this was probably just an oversight. They’re both easy-to-fix problems, but they could have easily been avoided.

ld37-03

I’ve left my mixtape in all three of these Bunsen burners.

The third and final experiment is the Flame Test, which tasks you with carrying different elements into three flames. Each flame expects the element that makes it burn in a particular colour, as dictated by the chart next to the Bunsen burners and the base of each burner. All other elements go in the bin; if you’re too slow trashing elements, you’ll fail the game, and if you put the incorrect element in a flame, that flame will go out and losing all flames results in failure too.

In hindsight, I should have made the Bunsen burners explode when you get things wrong. It’s basically the only thing wrong with this minigame.

ld37-04

For the flame test minigame, I invented new elements so I could make more interesting flame colours. There’s a line of posters along the wall with short descriptions of them all. Given how long it took me to think up the new element types and make posters and models for each of them, I would have liked to make more games that utilise them all, but unfortunately I didn’t have enough time. One game idea I had was a solution-mixing table, which had a bunch of coloured solutions and you had to make the requested colour. However, it’s not really an experiment that’s easy to make hectic and if you’ve ever dealt with transition metal ions yourself, you’d know that this type of colour change chemistry can be a little complex. For the two people that got that tortured chemistry pun, I’ll see myself out.

I was, however, pleased with how the game came out graphically. The only issue I had was trying to make a roof and windows; doing that messed up the lighting, and any amount of time trying to work out Unity’s area lights and baked global illumination seemed to be wasted in the end.

You can give the game a go by visiting the Ludum Dare page, where you can vote if you took part in the competition, or directly on my Google Drive.

Advertisements

One thought on “Chemical Chaos ~ Ludum Dare 37 (One Room)

Comments are closed.